Should I use “their” or “there?” “Is” or “are?” “I” or “me?”

The list of befuddling questions regarding grammar seem almost endless. Many years ago, or not so many years ago, you tried to solve the grammar puzzle to earn high marks in school but now the importance of grammar goes well beyond grades. Producing articles, advertisements, business cards or even emails with grammatical errors won’t earn you an “F” but instead may cost you cold hard cash.

Here are 5 reasons you should bone up on your spelling, comma usage and sentence structure.

  1.     Less grammar mistakes equals more promotions

If you want that corner office you might want to consider re-reading that report you turn into your boss. According to a recent Grammarly study of LinkedIn profiles, professionals who earned 6-9 promotions made 45% fewer grammatical errors than those who’d been promoted 1-4 times.

  1.     Ignoring proper grammar in emails can turn off customers

If you or your employees send out emails filled with errors, you may be losing business. Put yourself in the shoes of your clients and ask yourself, “If I received this email, would I be impressed?” Receiving an email riddled with grammar gaffes can induce questions of credibility. Implement an email proofreading policy so all electronic correspondence that leaves your servers are as close to correct as possible.

  1.     Proper grammar shows attention to detail

How many job requirements list “attention to detail” as a requirement? Well it seems as if all of them do. Using proper grammar shows that you truly do pay attention to details.

  1.     Impress professional clients with professional proposals

Landing a client with a proposal filled with improper word usage, comma errors and poor sentence structure definitely reveals that your establishment either lacks the ability to use grammar properly or even worse just doesn’t care. Either way you risk losing present and future business.

  1.     Errors in advertising and promotional materials can cost you big time

In 2011 clothing chain Old Navy produced thousands of college themed T-shirts that featured the words “Lets Go” instead of the proper “Let’s Go.” The apparel giant had to reprint thousands of shirts due to one simple apostrophe. When producing copy for an advertising campaign or promotional materials, ensure words are spelled correctly and grammar is spot on. If you don’t, prepare your bank account for a major hit